When is it Time to Use a Resume Writing Service?

Most job seekers know that their resume is the most important part of their application packet. Having a subpar resume can easily land you in the discard pile, so it’s important to get it right the first time.

But, with the plethora of information available on how to write a resume, do you really need a resume writing service to handle the work for you? Some people feel confident handling the formation of their resume alone, while others would prefer the help of a professional. However, in many cases, you don’t know what you don’t know. There’s a tremendous amount of advice online, but how much of it accurate information that you should be a following? A true resume expert can put you on the right path with techniques that actually work.

However, there are certain circumstances where choosing a resume writing service is a very smart move. Here are a few to consider.

When You’ve Been Off the Job Market

If it has been a while since you were a job seeker, it could be wise to work with a resume writing service. Why? Because the standards used to judge resumes have changed significantly over recent years and it can be hard to restructure your last resume based on current trends.

A professional resume writer understands the idiosyncrasies associated with these documents as well as how to make your information stand out from the crowd. They have often spent years studying the form and function of resumes, effectively giving them insider knowledge that you don’t possess.

When You Need Personalized Advice

Even if you have a general understanding about constructing resumes, that doesn’t mean you wouldn’t benefit from professional advice. If you have your dream job in your sights, working with a resume writing service can ensure the document is properly tailored to the position, upping your chances of scoring an interview.

Personalized advice can also be helpful if you are about to take a big step in your career. If you’ve recently finished a degree or gathered enough experience to make a leap forward, working with a resume writing service helps ensure you don’t miss any key details simply because you aren’t as familiar with what the upper-level hiring managers want to see.

Another instance when you can benefit from professional advice is in dealing with a gap in your career. Resume writing services understand how to minimize these deficiencies, allowing your resume to be viewed more favorably when it is reviewed.

When You’re Not Getting Results

If you’ve been sending your resume out for months and you haven’t landed an interview, then this could also be a sign you need a professional resume writer on your side. Sometimes, it’s hard to spot issues in your own writing, and having another set of eyes on your resume might allow issues to be more easily identified. Resume writing services can make important modifications to your resume, ensuring it makes the best impression possible and helping you score more interviews.

If you think you could benefit from some resume help, the team at Resume Spice wants to hear from you. Contact us today and see how our professional services and skilled consultants can provide the assistance you need to succeed.

Top 5 Things Hiring Managers Look for on Resumes

You spend hours polishing your resume. You write and re-write until it’s just right. But have you wondered what HR looks for on a resume – and whether yours fits the bill or misses the mark?

If you have you’re certainly not alone, and we’re here to help. Below are some of the best resume tips to incorporate into your next round of edits, so you can get noticed and get a call for an interview.

Tip #1: Proper grammar and spelling.

If your resume is full of typos and weak grammar, your resume is going to wind up in the recycling bin, no matter how experienced you are. That’s why it’s vital that you proofread your resume multiple times and then ask a trusted friend or family member to do the same for you.

Tip #2: A successful track record.

When it comes to your professional resume, hiring managers want to know more than just your tasks and responsibilities. They want to find out about the contributions you’ve made and how they’ve impacted your past employers in a positive way. So, include accomplishments with each job title that you can quantify with percentages, time periods, dollar amounts, statistics, or in other ways.

Tip #3: A career progression that makes sense.

When hiring managers see a spotty work history, inconsistencies, or a lot of gaps on your professional resume, it’s going to detract from your ability to get the offer. Instead, when it comes to work history, employers look for a career progression that makes sense and has generally an upward trajectory.

Tip #4: The right skills and experience.

If a hiring manager is looking for an administrative assistant with five years of experience and you have one year, don’t expect a callback. Hiring managers are scanning resumes for skills and experience. And if you’re applying to jobs that you aren’t truly qualified for, you’re wasting their time and your own.

Tip #5: It’s easy to read.

Hiring managers are busy people. So, when it comes time for them to scan your resume (which is what they do), make it easy for them. Use bold-faced type for your past job titles and bullet out your tasks and responsibilities. Also, include plenty of white space and use a font size bigger than 10. Sending in a two-page resume is better than submitting one crammed with tiny type.

The bottom line? You might be the perfect fit for the job. But if you’re not keeping in mind the five tips above, then you might not be considered. 

Next time you’re wondering what employers look for on a resume, turn to ResumeSpice. We have the answers you need so you can create a professional resume that gets results. Just call us today at 832.930.7378.

 

 

200+ Action Verbs and Power Words to Include in Your Resume

Coming up with unique action verbs to start every resume bullet is no easy task. But it’s worth the time and effort to help add punch to your resume.

The team at ResumeSpice has compiled the ultimate list of resume action verbs – over 200 words that you will help your resume stand out in a sea of “Responsible for” bullets that HR and hiring managers are tired of reading.

accelerated
accomplished
accumulated
achieved
acquired
activated
adapted
adjusted
administered
advised
allocated
analyzed
annotated
anticipated
applied
appraised
arranged
articulated
assembled
assessed
assigned
authored
balanced
briefed
budgeted
built
catalogued
categorized
chaired
championed
clarified
cleared
coded
collaborated
collected
compared
compiled
completed
composed
computed
conducted
consolidated
constructed
contacted
continued
contracted
convened
conveyed
coordinated
corresponded
counseled
created
critiqued
decided
defined
delegated
delivered
demonstrated
derived
designed
designated
detected
determined
developed
devised
directed
distributed
downsized
drafted
edited
educated
effected
elicited
encouraged
enlisted
established
evaluated
examined
executed
exhibited
expanded
expedited
experienced
experimented
explained
explored
extended
facilitated
figured
financed
focused
forecasted
formed
formulated
fostered
founded
functioned
gained
generated
governed
grouped
guided
helped
identified
illustrated
immunized
implemented
improved
increased
indexed
informed
initiated
instituted
instructed
interpreted
interviewed
introduced
invented
investigated
judged
led
listened
maintained
managed
marketed
mastered
measured
mediated
merged
modeled
modified
molded
monitored
motivated
named
negotiated
observed
obtained
operated
ordered
organized
originated
outlined
oversaw
perceived
performed
persuaded
planned
planted
presented
presided
printed
processed
accelerated
accomplished
accumulated
achieved
acquired
activated
adapted
adjusted
administered
advised
allocated
analyzed
annotated
anticipated
applied
appraised
arranged
articulated
assembled
assessed
assigned
authored
balanced
briefed
budgeted
built
catalogued
categorized
chaired
championed
clarified
cleared
coded
collaborated
collected
compared
compiled
completed
composed
computed
conducted
consolidated
constructed
contacted
continued
contracted
convened
conveyed
coordinated
corresponded
counseled
created
critiqued
decided
defined
delegated
delivered
demonstrated
derived
designed
designated
detected
determined
developed
devised
directed
distributed
downsized
drafted
edited
educated
effected
elicited
encouraged
enlisted
established
evaluated
examined
executed
exhibited
expanded
expedited
experienced
experimented
explained
explored
extended
facilitated
figured
financed
focused
forecasted
formed
formulated
fostered
founded
functioned
gained
generated
governed
grouped
guided
helped
identified
illustrated
immunized
implemented
improved
increased
indexed
informed
initiated
instituted
instructed
interpreted
interviewed
introduced
invented
investigated
judged
led
listened
maintained
managed
marketed
mastered
measured
mediated
merged
modeled
modified
molded
monitored
motivated
named
negotiated
observed
obtained
operated
ordered
organized
originated
outlined
oversaw
perceived
performed
persuaded
planned
planted
presented
presided
printed
processed
produced
promoted
protected
provided
publicized
quantified
questioned
raised
recommended
recorded
recruited
reduced
rendered
reorganized
repaired
reported
represented
reproduced
researched
resolved
responded
restored
retained
retrieved
revamped
reviewed
revised
rewrote
routed
scheduled
searched
selected
served
screened
shaped
shared
showed
simplified
solicited
solved
sourced
specified
spoke
stimulated
streamlined
structured
studied
succeeded
summarized
supervised
supported
surpassed
syndicated
synthesized
targeted
taught
tested
tracked
trained
translated
tutored
updated
utilized
validated
verified
wrote
produced
promoted
protected
provided
publicized
quantified
questioned
raised
recommended
recorded
recruited
reduced
rendered
reorganized
repaired
reported
represented
reproduced
researched
resolved
responded
restored
retained
retrieved
revamped
reviewed
revised
rewrote
routed
scheduled
searched
selected
served
screened
shaped
shared
showed
simplified
solicited
solved
sourced
specified
spoke
stimulated
streamlined
structured
studied
succeeded
summarized
supervised
supported
surpassed
syndicated
synthesized
targeted
taught
tested
tracked
trained
translated
tutored
updated
utilized
validated
verified
wrote


If you would like to talk to a ResumeSpice career consultant about preparing a customized resume for you, please contact us today! We’d love to help you.

Why People Lie on Their Resume (and Why You Shouldn’t!)

As one of the country’s leading resume writing companies, ResumeSpice knows how competitive the job market can be. Unfortunately, in their battle to land a job, some candidates are tempted to stretch the truth on their resumes. In fact, some studies estimate that over half of all resumes contain some fibs. We’re here to warn you that if a lie is caught on a resume, two scenarios can occur:

If a lie is uncovered during hiring, you will be removed from the hiring process, which would be a disaster if you were a perfect fit for that position.

If you’re hired and then the lie is discovered, you could get fired for providing misinformation during the hiring process.

Either way, your best bet is to stick to the truth.

What areas are candidates commonly exaggerating, inventing, or flat out lying about on their resumes? Let’s take a look:

Employment History

If you worked with a company for six months, don’t try to stretch it out to a year.  Remember, it’s okay to round up a month when you worked some time in that same month, but don’t try to stretch your employment dates or lie about gaps in employment. It’s a silly lie and it’s easily discovered through a reference phone call or email.

Job Titles

Job titles are one of the most common areas employment-seekers try to lie about. They may attempt to pump up their title by adding a “senior” in front of it, or invent a position that doesn’t even exist in the company. In most cases, hiring managers will research your work history before they offer you the job. Don’t ruin your chances of your dream job by trying to create new job titles that your previous employer can’t confirm.

Education

If you don’t meet the educational requirements to get the job, don’t lie about it on your resume. All it takes is one quick phone call or email for an employer to verify your educational background. If you’re currently attending school, it’s okay to list that on your resume, just make sure it is clear that you have not received your degree yet.

References

Reference checking is one of the last steps in the hiring process. If you’ve made it to this far, don’t sabotage all your efforts by providing a potential hiring manager with fake references. In addition, avoid giving your friends and family acting lessons to impersonate someone else. Instead, talk to your coworkers and see if you have anyone who would be willing to provide a reference.

Skill Level

When you lie about your skill level on your resume, you could really be setting yourself up for failure. Should you get hired, you may not have the knowledge and experience to actually perform on the job. For instance, if the position requires SharePoint design and you only know the basics, you could be in for a struggle. Instead, highlight your ability to learn and adapt to new pieces of software on the job.

Most potential employers don’t expect perfection. However, they do expect candidates to be honest about their background and experience. If you’re not, and you do get hired, you may find yourself constantly be looking over your shoulder. Don’t dismiss what you bring to the table by stretching the truth – it’s not worth it.

Need more help creating a strong resume – let us help! As one of the country’s leading professional resume writing services, ResumeSpice can help you produce a winning resume. Contact us today to learn more at 832.930.7378.

Is Bad Advice Killing Your Job Search?

It seems like everyone (and their well-meaning cousin) has a piece of career advice when it comes to job hunting. As one of the leading resume writing agencies in Houston, ResumeSpice has seen firsthand how the advice of even the best-intentioned friends, family members, and trusted colleagues can actually foil your job search and prevent you from landing a new position.

So what advice should you toss out of the window? Let’s take a look:

Myth #1: A Resume Must be One Page
Sure, this was the standard practice years ago, but not anymore. Your resume can be and should be, if you’re highly experienced, more than one page. It’s better to have an easy-to-read and well-formatted resume that’s two pages long, than an unreadable and poorly formatted resume that’s crammed into one page. That said, don’t go overboard and submit a resume that’s longer than it needs to be to reflect your experience. The one page resume myth is so pervasive, we wrote a blog post about it.

Myth #2: You Should Apply to As Many Jobs as You Can
Hiring managers can quickly identify whether or not you’re right for the job. So if you’re sending your resume like spam mail – just because “hey, you never know” – you’re only wasting your time and the hiring manager’s by applying to every position under the sun. Instead, spend your time crafting customized resumes and cover letters for the few positions you truly are a great fit for.

Myth #3: Companies Post All Openings
If there’s a company you’re interested in working for – say you love their product or you’re a loyal user of their service – reach out to them, even if they haven’t posted a position. In your cover letter, be sure to communicate why you are passionate about working for the company and what you plan on bringing to the table to create a positive impact there. The fact that there isn’t a job posted can actually help your chances, as there’s likely to be less competition. Company’s love hearing from candidates who have a true passion and desire to work for them.

Myth #4: Staffing Agencies Don’t Help
Back in the day, staffing agencies were used to fill administrative and industrial type positions. Today’s staffing agencies place highly skilled professionals in fields ranging from accounting to IT to human resources. If you’re someone with plenty of experience under your belt, and you’d like some professional help finding your next job, a staffing agency can help get you there.

If you’re ready to begin your job hunt and need a resume that works for you – let us help! As one of the country’s leading professional resume writing services, ResumeSpice can help you produce a winning resume. Contact us today to learn more at 832.930.7378.

3 Reasons To Never Use a Functional Resume Format

One of the most common questions we receive here at ResumeSpice is, “Does format really matter?” It’s been well established that recruiters don’t spend a lot of time screening resumes. So it’s crucial to keep their attention and it begins with the correct format. We don’t want you to lose out on your dream job due to resume formatting, so we’re here to tell you one format you should never use.

It’s called the functional resume.

This format is designed to highlight your achievements under a skill set rather than a chronological order of date and place of employment. Recruiters and employers who see functional resumes immediately become disengaged or, even worse, look over the resume altogether. Simply, a functional resume should never be used and this is why.

6 Seconds of Comprehension

We’ve mentioned in a previous blog that you may get around six seconds of a recruiters’ time when they pull up your resume. That’s a very short period to decide if a candidate should move forward or be taken out of the running for a potential position. A functional resume hinders recruiters from understanding your career path timeline – or the details. Functional resumes require digging and recruiters do not have enough time to connect your skills to your job history. Stick to a format that always places your skills and achievements next to your company and tenure.

Hiding Information

Hiring managers and recruiters carry suspicions of any resume with a functional style. They have a good reason; the vast majority of job seekers who utilize this resume format are doing so in order to hide something. And recruiters know it. Oftentimes the candidate has the best intention when trying not to display a job gap or a string of short-held positions. However, a functional resume only highlights those pieces of information. Reverse chronological order is best at highlighting that you’ve moved forward despite the bumps.

Unclear

It may seem like your skill set is lost amongst your job history but it’s actually not. When you provide context by showing where, when, and how you accomplished an achievement or mastered a skill, it speaks to the employer.  Functional resumes, simply put, make poor story-tellers. They give no context for an accomplishment or skill. Remember, how you did it holds just as much merit as what you did. That’s why it is not ideal to separate what you achieved from your place of employment.

If a functional resume isn’t a solution, then what can you do? If you have resume gaps or perhaps a time period you weren’t thrilled about in your career, I suggest reading How to Handle a Career Gap on Your Resume. You can also utilize a chronological format which will display your most current position and allow recruiters to effectively review your resume.

Need more help creating a strong resume – and finding a new job? Call ResumeSpice. As one of the country’s leading professional resume writing services, we can help you produce a winning resume. Contact us today to learn more at 832.930.7378.

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